About FairPlay

What We Do

team_edited.png

Who We Are

FairPlay is a women-led, speech-language pathologist founded 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that strives to make play accessible and affordable for all children, including kids with disabilities who may not be able to play with toys as they come off-the-shelf. 

 

The FairPlay network consists of speech pathologists, occupational therapists, psychologists, engineers, educators, parents, and graduate students. Our team shares the common vision of a world where all children have equal access to play, regardless of their abilities.

What We Do

Toy Accessibility Workshops 

FairPlay hosts adaptive toy workshops to teach parents, clinicians, and students how to adapt toys on their own. Our workshops also raise awareness about adaptive toys and the children that enjoy them. 

FairPlay hosts workshops open to the community, as well as privately coordinated workshops for individual clinics, university classes, and service learning programs. 

FP Workshop Screenshot.jpeg
Levi Workshop Photo.jpg
AdaptedToyLibraries.JPG

Adaptive Toy Lending Libraries

FairPlay is building an international lending-library system of adaptive toys that allows children with disabilities to enjoy the benefits of playing with a broad selection of adapted toys for free.

 

A FairPlay adaptive toy library is a selection of 3-10 switch-adapted toys that can be used by several children over time. 

Our toy lending-libraries exist in schools, clinics, and other child-focused community centers. How the libraries are used differs. Often, teachers keep FairPlay toy libraries as classroom resources. Clinicians (e.g. SLPs, OTs) often loan toys to families to use at home. 

FAQ: Why are toy libraries needed?

 

Though switch-adapting toys is simple and inexpensive, market prices of adapted toys can be 3-5x that of normal toys, placing additional financial burden on families already navigating inordinate care-related costs. Given children’s quickly changing interests and these high costs, children with disabilities tend not to have adequate access to play.